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Breakingviews

Reuters Breakingviews is the world's leading source of agenda-setting financial insight. As the Reuters brand for financial commentary, we dissect the big business and economic stories as they break around the world every day. A global team of about 30 correspondents in New York, London, Hong Kong and other major cities provides expert analysis in real time. Sign up for a free trial of our full service at http://www.breakingviews.com/trial and follow us on Twitter @Breakingviews and at www.breakingviews.com. All opinions expressed are those of the authors.

Fox pokes sleeping advertising bear

Rupert Murdoch's Fox is poking a sleeping advertising bear. For the second time this year, one of the entertainment conglomerate's popular prime-time programs faces a branding boycott. Twenty-First Century Fox isn't alone, though. YouTube, the web-video site operated by Alphabet's Google, has recently been in the crosshairs, too. Madison Avenue may be slowly transforming from a passive investor to a more activist one.

Holding: Courts may save startups from redemptions

Favoring antsy venture capitalists could be asking for trouble. Cashing out these early financial backers of fledgling firms on demand can leave longer-term investors in a lurch. A case involving onetime dot-com darling Oversee.net and Oak Hill Capital suggests some judges find the practice potentially disloyal to startups and their owners. It’s an overdue warning about the damage such conflicts of interest can cause.

Viewsroom: Trump budgets his way to la-la land

Basic economics - and decency - fall by the wayside in the administration’s pitch that it can create $2 trln of revenue by cutting $3.6 trln of costs. OPEC and U.S. fields battle for oil supremacy. Zimbabwe invents the zollar. And Bill Ford escapes his CEO’s crash unscathed.

Post-election Merkel could change her spots

Germany’s new chancellor will probably be its old one. Angela Merkel is on track to win a fourth term in the country’s Sept. 24 vote. Unlike France and the Netherlands, which voted earlier this year, Germany faces no credible threat from anti-European firebrands. But the next Merkel government could come in different flavours, depending on her choice of coalition partner.

Post-election Merkel could change her spots

Germany’s new chancellor will probably be its old one. Angela Merkel is on track to win a fourth term in the country’s Sept. 24 vote. Unlike France and the Netherlands, which voted earlier this year, Germany faces no credible threat from anti-European firebrands. But the next Merkel government could come in different flavours, depending on her choice of coalition partner.

Post-election Merkel could change her spots

Germany’s new chancellor will probably be its old one. Angela Merkel is on track to win a fourth term in the country’s Sept. 24 vote. Unlike France and the Netherlands, which voted earlier this year, Germany faces no credible threat from anti-European firebrands. But the next Merkel government could come in different flavours, depending on her choice of coalition partner.

Market forces fail working women in Asian hubs

For women striving for a seat at the top table, Asia is a depressing place. Hong Kong and Singapore lag Western peers in terms of number of females in the boardroom. Despite the known business benefits and an ample pool of talent, there has been glacial progress in promoting the gender. It is time for local authorities to ditch market forces and embrace quotas to fix the imbalance.

Hadas: The next financial crisis could be in forex

For centuries, cross-border trade has come with a currency problem. The expansion of globalisation has not made it any less pressing. The dilemma identified by the economist Robert Triffin is a powerful – and alarmingly current – reminder that a worldwide foreign exchange crisis is only one big mood change away.

Glencore food binge could leave investors hungry

Glencore has fought hard for a lean balance sheet. Now it has one, it can keep things simple and give more money to shareholders, or binge on an acquisition. A merger approach to U.S. agricultural trader Bunge suggests Chief Executive Ivan Glasenberg favours the latter, somewhat riskier course of action. Such boldness could leave investors going hungry.

Indian yogi shows power of local consumer kings

An Indian yogi is demonstrating the power of local consumer champions. Baba Ramdev, a saffron-robed tycoon, says his company, Patanjali Ayurved, doubled sales last year to more than $1.6 billion, making it bigger than the local arms of Colgate and GlaxoSmithKline. His multinational rivals barely grew at all over the same period, as a shock move to scrap bank notes disrupted everyday life. Patanjali's powerful pull underscores a new trend of emerging market consum