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Breakingviews

Reuters Breakingviews is the world's leading source of agenda-setting financial insight. As the Reuters brand for financial commentary, we dissect the big business and economic stories as they break around the world every day. A global team of about 30 correspondents in New York, London, Hong Kong and other major cities provides expert analysis in real time. Sign up for a free trial of our full service at http://www.breakingviews.com/trial and follow us on Twitter @Breakingviews and at www.breakingviews.com. All opinions expressed are those of the authors.

Twitter unduly attracts financial followers

Twitter has undeservedly attracted a bunch of new followers. The struggling social-media company touted surprise user growth as evidence it can get back on track under moonlighting Chief Executive Jack Dorsey. Revenue, however, fell 8 percent in the first quarter, a first since Twitter went public in 2013, as advertisers grew skeptical.

Credit Suisse's Thiam picks capital over returns

Tidjane Thiam’s plan to raise new capital isn’t the Credit Suisse boss’s first U-turn. Compared with other big reversals – like his decision in 2016 to dump securitised products and leave investors nursing big losses – this is, at least, the good kind.

Add Wells Fargo chairman to fake-accounts firings

It's time to add Wells Fargo's chairman to the list of fake-accounts firings. Just 56 percent of shareholders backed Stephen Sanger at the bank's annual meeting on Tuesday. That’s a stinging rebuke for his failure as lead director. After 5,300 employees and the Chief Executive John Stumpf paid with their jobs, Sanger and other board members with lackluster support should go, too, to help the bank rehabilitate.

Credit Suisse's Thiam picks capital over returns

Tidjane Thiam’s plan to raise new capital isn’t the Credit Suisse boss’s first U-turn. Compared with other big reversals – like his decision in 2016 to dump securitised products and leave investors nursing big losses – this is, at least, the good kind.

Toshiba axing PwC would be ugly bid to stay listed

Toshiba's move to switch accountants reflects a desperation to avoid delisting. The crisis-stricken Japanese group may ditch the Big Four auditor it hired only last year, Reuters reported on Wednesday, which might force the firm to risk using a second-tier player. That is an ugly look for a firm that badly needs to win back the trust of regulators and investors.

Tyson makes shareholders tasty $3.2 bln sandwich

Tyson Foods has found a delectable new bite to swallow in its quest to become America’s premier protein provider from the farmyard to the kitchen table. Its $3.2 billion purchase of ready-to-eat sandwich maker AdvancePierre takes the Springdale, Arkansas-based poultry company further up the food value chain. Along with plans to carve off some less wholesome morsels, Tyson is giving investors plenty to cluck about.

Trump finds a trade battle worth fighting

Donald Trump has found a trade battle that’s actually worth fighting. The U.S. president is slapping an average 20 percent duty on Canadian softwood lumber after decades of officials complaining of subsidies. The U.S. government has a good case for going after one of the nation’s closest allies.

Theresa May channels Margaret Thatcher in reverse

Theresa May is shaping up to be like Margaret Thatcher, but in reverse. In the 1980s, Britain’s first female prime minister launched a swathe of market-friendly reforms which increased the country’s appeal for inward investment but made her unpopular with sections of the population. News that May’s Conservative Party will pledge to cap fuel prices in its forthcoming election manifesto suggests a fundamentally different set of priorities.

IPO delay lifts spotlight off China's shadow banks

China's trust industry could use a little sunlight. The first stock market listing in 20 years is up in the air, after Shandong International Trust missed a regulatory deadline in Hong Kong. This is a pity. The initial public offering would have helped investors and regulators decipher the high-yielding trust products at the core of China’s intricate shadow-banking industry.