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Breakingviews

Reuters Breakingviews is the world's leading source of agenda-setting financial insight. As the Reuters brand for financial commentary, we dissect the big business and economic stories as they break around the world every day. A global team of about 30 correspondents in New York, London, Hong Kong and other major cities provides expert analysis in real time. Sign up for a free trial of our full service at http://www.breakingviews.com/trial and follow us on Twitter @Breakingviews and at www.breakingviews.com. All opinions expressed are those of the authors.

Breakingviews - Cox: “China does it” is a bad antitrust argument

Facebook can make reasonable arguments about why the $530 billion internet company shouldn’t be broken up, either through regulatory pressure, legislative fiat or shareholder desire. The least persuasive of them is that the social network’s Chinese digital rivals won’t ever face the same fate.

Breakingviews - Jobs will define Narendra Modi’s next five years

Narendra Modi faces a jobs problem. Early results on Thursday suggest the prime minister's Bharatiya Janata party has won a second term. Filled with nationalist sentiment following air strikes against Pakistan earlier this year, voters have looked past an employment crisis. The leader of this $3 trillion economy can’t afford to do the same.

Breakingviews - Hadas: “Zero privacy” is both blessing and curse

“You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.” Much has changed in the 20 years since Scott McNealy dismissed complaints about the nascent Big Brothers of internet commerce. For example, in the European Union it now takes several extra keystrokes to locate the quote from the chief executive of then-Big Tech firm Sun Microsystems, and to officially abandon that little bit of internet privacy.

Breakingviews - Google's hidden costs give Beijing sticker shock

Google's hidden costs are giving Beijing sticker shock. Washington, busily upping the trade war ante, may ultimately ban Chinese telecom champion Huawei from using Google's proprietary technology, including its app store. The search engine is blocked in China, but local handset makers selling abroad have come to rely on the group’s technology anyway: the open-source Android system powers their phones. An embargo would threaten much of a $175 billion export mar

Breakingviews - British Steel rescue loan is worst of bad options

Greg Clark has one of the worst jobs in the UK government. The business secretary needs to decide whether to nationalise British Steel, let it go bust with the loss of at least 5,000 jobs, or apply a sticking plaster to let it limp on. All three are bad options, but the last is the worst.

Breakingviews - Huawei takes trade war into uncharted territory

Huawei is taking the trade war into uncharted territory. The onslaught by President Donald Trump’s administration on one of China’s biggest companies marks a worrying turning point. Such a relentless assault on a flagship corporate giant is virtually unprecedented. That makes everything much less predictable from here.

Breakingviews - Donald Trump may yet play Huawei-saving wild card

Donald Trump’s unpredictability could yet play in Huawei Technologies’ favor. The Chinese telecommunications firm has effectively been cut off from U.S. suppliers, from chipmaker Qualcomm to Alphabet’s Google. But that happened to Huawei rival ZTE too, and the president relented. Though it’s more of a stretch, a similar reprieve for Huawei can’t be ruled out.

Breakingviews - The Exchange: The trouble with America

The country no longer loves the unremarkable and its inequitable universities are unsustainable, NYU’s Scott Galloway tells Breakingviews. As his new book “The Algebra of Happiness” hits the shelves, he also discusses his prescient Amazon call and why Big Tech needs breaking up.