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FOTOS | Freitag, 23. August 2019, 05:05 Uhr

Victims of 'La Bestia,' Mexico's notorious migrant train, learn to walk again

Mario, 34, a Honduran migrant who lost his leg while traveling en route to the United States on a freight train known as "La Bestia", rests during a physiotherapy session at the Rehabilitation Center for Disabled People in Silao, Mexico, August 19, 2019. Migrants learn to walk again with new prosthetic limbs after being injured by The Death Train, so named for the risks posed by traveling on it north through Mexico to the U.S. border.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Mario, 34, a Honduran migrant who lost his leg while traveling en route to the United States on a freight train known as "La Bestia", rests during a physiotherapy session at the Rehabilitation Center for Disabled People in Silao, Mexico, August 19,...more

Mario, 34, a Honduran migrant who lost his leg while traveling en route to the United States on a freight train known as "La Bestia", rests during a physiotherapy session at the Rehabilitation Center for Disabled People in Silao, Mexico, August 19, 2019. Migrants learn to walk again with new prosthetic limbs after being injured by The Death Train, so named for the risks posed by traveling on it north through Mexico to the U.S. border. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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A prosthetic technician works in a prosthetic leg for Luis, 21. The train, which transports sugar and grains to cement and minerals, has helped legions of north-bound Central Americans flee extortionists, kidnappers, and more recently, migration agents and police who swarm highways and board buses.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A prosthetic technician works in a prosthetic leg for Luis, 21. The train, which transports sugar and grains to cement and minerals, has helped legions of north-bound Central Americans flee extortionists, kidnappers, and more recently, migration...more

A prosthetic technician works in a prosthetic leg for Luis, 21. The train, which transports sugar and grains to cement and minerals, has helped legions of north-bound Central Americans flee extortionists, kidnappers, and more recently, migration agents and police who swarm highways and board buses. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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A prosthetic technician adjusts a prosthetic leg for a migrant. But many, in their quest for safer lives, have fallen to their deaths or suffered grievous injuries as it careens around bends and through tunnels in remote or cartel-controlled expanses, with dozens perched on slippery roofs or hanging from handles between cars.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A prosthetic technician adjusts a prosthetic leg for a migrant. But many, in their quest for safer lives, have fallen to their deaths or suffered grievous injuries as it careens around bends and through tunnels in remote or cartel-controlled...more

A prosthetic technician adjusts a prosthetic leg for a migrant. But many, in their quest for safer lives, have fallen to their deaths or suffered grievous injuries as it careens around bends and through tunnels in remote or cartel-controlled expanses, with dozens perched on slippery roofs or hanging from handles between cars. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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A prosthetic technician works in a prosthetic leg for Luis, 21. Since 2011 a special Red Cross program, which moved in June to a strategic midpoint of the train line, has attended to 411 mutilated migrants, most of whom lost limbs, giving the few who were found in time a fresh lease on life.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A prosthetic technician works in a prosthetic leg for Luis, 21. Since 2011 a special Red Cross program, which moved in June to a strategic midpoint of the train line, has attended to 411 mutilated migrants, most of whom lost limbs, giving the few who...more

A prosthetic technician works in a prosthetic leg for Luis, 21. Since 2011 a special Red Cross program, which moved in June to a strategic midpoint of the train line, has attended to 411 mutilated migrants, most of whom lost limbs, giving the few who were found in time a fresh lease on life. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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A prosthetic leg for a migrant is pictured at the Rehabilitation Center for Disabled People. Now, with more Central Americans stowed away on board the trains amid a Mexican crackdown on bus and walking routes, the Red Cross program is busier than ever. Specialists have been treating five to eight new patients with amputated limbs a month this year, up from three to four a month last year, said Luis Sauceda, a doctor specialized in medical rehabilitation in the Guanajuato Rehabilitation Center.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

A prosthetic leg for a migrant is pictured at the Rehabilitation Center for Disabled People. Now, with more Central Americans stowed away on board the trains amid a Mexican crackdown on bus and walking routes, the Red Cross program is busier than...more

A prosthetic leg for a migrant is pictured at the Rehabilitation Center for Disabled People. Now, with more Central Americans stowed away on board the trains amid a Mexican crackdown on bus and walking routes, the Red Cross program is busier than ever. Specialists have been treating five to eight new patients with amputated limbs a month this year, up from three to four a month last year, said Luis Sauceda, a doctor specialized in medical rehabilitation in the Guanajuato Rehabilitation Center. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Alan exercises during a physiotherapy session. Lack of money led Honduran former soldier Alan Abarca, 49, to skip the bus and board the train to reach the United States, months after getting deported, and he lost his left leg for it. He hopped between hula hoops on his remaining right leg to regain balance and strength. Afterwards, he pulled his stump out of its sock, revealing a mosaic of pink and white skin, still too raw for the prosthetic.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Alan exercises during a physiotherapy session. Lack of money led Honduran former soldier Alan Abarca, 49, to skip the bus and board the train to reach the United States, months after getting deported, and he lost his left leg for it. He hopped...more

Alan exercises during a physiotherapy session. Lack of money led Honduran former soldier Alan Abarca, 49, to skip the bus and board the train to reach the United States, months after getting deported, and he lost his left leg for it. He hopped between hula hoops on his remaining right leg to regain balance and strength. Afterwards, he pulled his stump out of its sock, revealing a mosaic of pink and white skin, still too raw for the prosthetic. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Alan exercises during a physiotherapy session. He said he had tried and failed to maintain his family in the impoverished Honduran city of Choloma. During a lifetime of odd jobs, his favorite was being a roofer, readily clambering up five stories. Now, he asked, choked with emotion: "What can I do?" Besides his wife and daughter, he had yet to inform other relatives about the accident, concerned that when word reaches his mother, her weak heart may fail. "Only when I can walk again" will he tell everyone, he said, with a twinkle in his eye.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Alan exercises during a physiotherapy session. He said he had tried and failed to maintain his family in the impoverished Honduran city of Choloma. During a lifetime of odd jobs, his favorite was being a roofer, readily clambering up five stories....more

Alan exercises during a physiotherapy session. He said he had tried and failed to maintain his family in the impoverished Honduran city of Choloma. During a lifetime of odd jobs, his favorite was being a roofer, readily clambering up five stories. Now, he asked, choked with emotion: "What can I do?" Besides his wife and daughter, he had yet to inform other relatives about the accident, concerned that when word reaches his mother, her weak heart may fail. "Only when I can walk again" will he tell everyone, he said, with a twinkle in his eye. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Luis exercises during a physiotherapy session. Luis Estuardo, 21, an accountant, had resorted to boarding the train after escaping migration agents who had pulled him and his brother off a bus as they were crossing from one southern Mexican state to the next, he said. "It was my first time," Estuardo said, of his Bestia journey. Others tried to pull him aboard as the train picked up speed, but he fell, and his left leg was shredded. Waiting by the side of the tracks, he fashioned a makeshift tourniquet to stem the bleeding, he said. Then, everything turned white. Five hours later, local authorities found him.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Luis exercises during a physiotherapy session. Luis Estuardo, 21, an accountant, had resorted to boarding the train after escaping migration agents who had pulled him and his brother off a bus as they were crossing from one southern Mexican state to...more

Luis exercises during a physiotherapy session. Luis Estuardo, 21, an accountant, had resorted to boarding the train after escaping migration agents who had pulled him and his brother off a bus as they were crossing from one southern Mexican state to the next, he said. "It was my first time," Estuardo said, of his Bestia journey. Others tried to pull him aboard as the train picked up speed, but he fell, and his left leg was shredded. Waiting by the side of the tracks, he fashioned a makeshift tourniquet to stem the bleeding, he said. Then, everything turned white. Five hours later, local authorities found him. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Luis Estuardo jumps during a physiotherapy session. Estuardo expressed gratitude to the Red Cross for being able to sleep again, despite phantom cramps. "I feel like a sculpture," he said, gripping a walker, as Gibran Guzman, the program's Munich-trained prosthetic technician, gently wrapped a plaster-soaked bandage around his amputated thigh. Every individual's prosthetic is unique, said Guzman, holding up the mold with which to design Estuardo's new calf, and a knee with a suspension device.

REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Luis Estuardo jumps during a physiotherapy session. Estuardo expressed gratitude to the Red Cross for being able to sleep again, despite phantom cramps. "I feel like a sculpture," he said, gripping a walker, as Gibran Guzman, the program's...more

Luis Estuardo jumps during a physiotherapy session. Estuardo expressed gratitude to the Red Cross for being able to sleep again, despite phantom cramps. "I feel like a sculpture," he said, gripping a walker, as Gibran Guzman, the program's Munich-trained prosthetic technician, gently wrapped a plaster-soaked bandage around his amputated thigh. Every individual's prosthetic is unique, said Guzman, holding up the mold with which to design Estuardo's new calf, and a knee with a suspension device. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Rony, 22, a Honduran migrant, exercises during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Rony, 22, a Honduran migrant, exercises during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Rony, 22, a Honduran migrant, exercises during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Olver, 21, a Honduran migrant, jumps during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Olver, 21, a Honduran migrant, jumps during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Olver, 21, a Honduran migrant, jumps during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Mario, 34, a Honduran migrant, exercises during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Mario, 34, a Honduran migrant, exercises during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Mario, 34, a Honduran migrant, exercises during a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Migrants from Central America arrive for a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Migrants from Central America arrive for a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Migrants from Central America arrive for a physiotherapy session. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Oliver (L) and Daniel, 21, Honduran migrants, speak at a shelter in Celaya, Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Oliver (L) and Daniel, 21, Honduran migrants, speak at a shelter in Celaya, Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Oliver (L) and Daniel, 21, Honduran migrants, speak at a shelter in Celaya, Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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Migrants from Central America eat at a shelter in Celaya, Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Migrants from Central America eat at a shelter in Celaya, Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

Migrants from Central America eat at a shelter in Celaya, Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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